Story Sale: A Living Planet (The Martian’s Husband)

Short story sale announcement: my near future science fiction story “A Living Planet” has sold to Analog Science Fiction and Fact! Publication date not set, but I’d expect late 2021.

This story has an unofficial second title: “The Martian’s Husband.” It’s inspired by the year I spent from summer 2015 to summer 2016, while my wife was on the crew of a year-long NASA-funded simulated Mars mission, with all our communications on a twenty-minute delay. This story means a lot to me, and it took me three years to get it ready to my satisfaction, and I’m so glad it found a home at a great magazine like Analog.

The spacecraft Hawai’iloa has fallen silent, halfway to Mars. Ethan’s wife is up there, receding and unreachable. But he still has a boss to win over, a job to keep. There’s nothing glamorous about his spot on the mission control team of an uncrewed orbital-cleanup spacecraft, but Ethan needs that simplicity. It keeps his eyes on the solid Earth and everything that might keep him sane, instead of raised to the emptiness above.

He’s waiting for word from space. But the Hawai’iloa might not be the only thing up there trying to contact Earth.

Star Trek and Optimistic SFF

UPDATE December 10: The recording is up on YouTube. Watch it here! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdAGook8pnk&list=WL&index=14

Are you familiar with the Worldbuilders charity? They work to unite the geek community into a charity-supporting machine, and partner with global charities to make the world a better place.

Worldbuilders Twitch stream events Dec 2-4, 2020This month they’re running the Something To Look Forward To #S2LF2 twitch stream to raise donations for the charity Heifer International. And this Friday I’ll be lending my hand and brain to the cause. Friday December 4th at 11am Central Time, I’ll be on the Worldbuilders Twitch stream for the panel “Star Trek & Optimistic SFF” with Martha Wells, Dana Pellebon, Sarah Gulde, and special guest Anthony Rapp.

Well, I’m nervous! But I’m also super excited! I’m not a deep font of Star Trek lore, but it’s the SF I grew up on – not as a young child, but at the start of my adolescence, taking in the ethical exemplars and new worlds of TNG after dinner with my parents. And perhaps because of that, I have a lot to say and think about optimistic SFF.

Come on down to the twitch on Friday, then check out all the other events. If you can’t make it out to elevensies, the discussion will be up later on the Worldbuilders YouTube channel. Either way, if you can afford it, consider a donation to Heifer International to help create sustainable change in the world!

Publication: Weights and Measures

My epic fantasy short story, “Weights and Measures,” is now available to read in Heroic Fantasy Quarterly issue 46! HFQ is free to read online, and you can support them via Patreon.

Agnella, senior priestess of the Trader, has come north to Senvosk to track a stolen relic. But by the time she arrives, the local priest has already been murdered. Agnella has only one local novice to rely on, as a rival god begins his hunt.Original art for Weights and Measures, by Gary McClusky

Heroic Fantasy Quarterly commissioned this awesome piece of original art for my story. Here’s a view of the opening image, the first exchange between Prelate Agnella and the East Wind.

I’ve written a lot of stories in this epic fantasy world, and this is the first one to see publication. In fact, I’ve written an entire novel. Perhaps someday you’ll all get to read about a certain up-and-coming priestess of the Trader who finished her training, earned a new name, and saw places farther beyond the edge of the world than even her childhood Senvosk.

 

Story Sale: Memories of Fire

Short story sale announcement: my contemporary fantasy noir “Memories of Fire” has sold to Translunar Travelers Lounge! It will appear in their issue #4 (February 2021).

The way Enoch remembers it, he’s been defending humankind from supernatural threats for thousands of years. God may have gone quiet, but his edicts still hold. When Enoch’s mortal handler brings him to Tripoli in the wake of Qaddafi’s downfall, he faces the one thing that could break the unending chain of his service: another fallen star like himself, free from the tyrants of Heaven and Earth.

Inspired by the mythology of Jewish apocrypha, especially 1 Enoch.

Publication: Machines in Motion

My Jewish steampunk short story, Machines in Motion, is available in Hybrid Fiction’s September 2020 issue! The publisher, Hybrid Fiction, is a new magazine showcasing stories that merge and combine genres – in my case, steampunk and historical fiction. For $3.99 (or less if you support them on Patreon) you’ll get 8 great stories, plus art, and a chance to support small creators and new magazines.

Machines in Motion Teaser Image

Not sold yet? Here’s a teaser sample of Machines in Motion released on their website last week.

A spoiler-free note on terminology: in the nineteenth century, prior to the mid-twentieth century, the word “Jew” (the noun) was primarily used as an insult. The adjective “Jewish” didn’t have the same connotations, but Jewish people largely referred to themselves as “Israelites” or similar ideas. This changed in the mid-twentieth century when the foundation of modern Israel created a different meaning for “People of Israel” and Jewish people largely (though not entirely) reclaimed the noun “Jew.”

Keep reading below here for some author notes about the story. May contain spoilers, so if you haven’t read yet, stop here!


Story Notes

Machines in Motion is about – among other things – the tensions of assimilation. Eszter comes to a clear conclusion at the end, but I consider that ending a dark one. She might get the career she wants, but she’s paying a steep price. The things she tells herself are, without exception, lies.

This story is being published on Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Ironic, for a story that seems to reject a Jewish identity. But no matter what Eszter tells herself, her experience is defined by a Jewish lens and faith. Like many of us here in the late 20th century, she’ll need to find a balance in the gearing: between the mechanisms her world expects, and the mechanisms that drive her.

Early in my writing career I wrote a series of stories about Eszter. Recently, I’ve had the good fortune to find homes for two of them. Machines in Motion is the second chronologically; the first one tells of Eszter’s escape from Budapest and her first meeting with Lujza, and will appear in the excellent Kaleidotrope in 2021 under the title The Promise of Iron.

Someday I may return to writing Eszter’s, because her path isn’t finished. She has a long way to go ahead of her.

Steampunk can be a difficult genre to write in. Too much of it is tied into Victoriana, and all that period’s implicit assumptions and oblivious, imperialistic dreams. But even a steampunk Europe contains people at the margins, who have much to gain – and much to lose – as new technologies and brutal wars upset the world’s entrenched patterns.

I am American, but much of my ancestry comes from Hungary, and I spent a week there once visiting distant relatives. Pálinka (Hungarian fruit brandy) can be good or terrible, but apricot is definitely the best flavor. Krémes is a very good Hungarian pastry, albeit not the best (that’s Zserbó), but Krémes has a refined fluffy lightness that better fits a noble like Sipos. Try them both and make your own decisions. You won’t regret it.

Story Sale: Cruise Control

Story sale announcement! My flash fiction piece “Cruise Control” will be published in the Spring 2021 issue of Fireside Fiction.

Stay tuned for a short little tale about retirees spending their sunset years with their brains transplanted inside “self-driving” cars. It’s the only surefire way to get away from your ungrateful adult kids.

I’m extra proud of this sale, not only because Fireside is an amazing & gorgeous magazine, but also because this  fills a Writer Bingo Square I never thought I’d fill: this story sold on its first submission.

Story Hour

Last night I was one of the author guest on Story Hour 2020, alongside Craig Laurence Gidney. In the space of about 45 minutes, we each read a story that touched on themes of death, communication, and subjectivity – in very different ways. I managed to get through the Scientist Ghost story without choking up too badly!

If you’d like to attend these readings at your leisure, in the comfort of your home, you can watch the recording anytime.

Worldcon Schedule 2020

2020 Worldcon (CoNZealand) is just around the corner! They’ve had some scheduling and related issues, but it looks like most of those issues have gotten sorted out, through lots of behind-the-scenes help from the Hugo finalist crew and other volunteers. Here’s my final lineup!

This event belongs to Alasdair and Marguerite, co-owners of Escape Artists, but I’ll show up for sure to say hi to Escape Pod fans!

Brain-machine interfaces are currently in early clinical trials, and they’ve proven the ability to let a human brain control a robotic limb. Sometime in the coming years, this technology will move from the laboratory to the public. How might society respond to the option of becoming a cyborg, and the presence of cyborgs among us? Many factors will influence this, including media, fiction, aesthetics, and what kinds of organizations drive the rollout. What responses do we expect, and how will these  responses vary in different cultures and communities?

Panelists: Benjamin C. Kinney (M), SL Huang, SB Divya, Errick Nunnally

Coffee time for New Zealand’s timezone, beer for me in the US. Have any questions about Escape Pod, or want to discuss a bit of neuroscience for your fiction and/or curioisity? Come hang out!

Is corporate control of research and the drive for short-term profit crippling scientific innovation and basic research? Do established companies always feel threatened by new technology and lobby for legislation to restrict it?

Panelists: Benjamin C. Kinney (M), Raymond Sheh, Keith Kato, Diane Kelly

Human rights are a contentious issue – while many nations signed the UN Declaration on Human Rights, that consensus only formed because the Declaration doesn’t specify where rights come from. How can the definition and origin of “universal” rights grapple with the rise of general artificial intelligence? What rights are inherent to people made of small, sub-sentient devices scattered across an asteroid belt, or to algorithms of commercial origin? Will the AIs think we deserve rights, or will they resent slow meatbrained humans passing judgment on them?

Panelists: Dr. Hirotaka Osawa, L.J. Kendall, Barbara Howe, Mikko Rauhala (M), Benjamin C. Kinney

Thalience and sentience. Is there really a difference? How do we tease it out?

Panelists: Karl Schroeder (M), Benjamin C. Kinney, Eli K.P. William, SB Divya

Want to help me pick which of my stories to read? Poll forthcoming on twitter early next week!

Fourth Street Fantasy Podcasts

In-person conventions may be canceled this year, but the community has prepared all kinds of remote options for you to enjoy. Fourth Street Fantasy is one of my favorite conventions, known for its tight-knit community and high-level discussions. This year, 4th Street is bringing those discussions straight to you in four panels, presented in podcast form (with transcripts).

This year’s panels are:

  • “In Which We Consider the Role of Hospitality in Stories”
  • “The Fantasy Feast, or the Same Old Immediate Road Stew”
  • “This is Fine: Making Art While the World Burns”
  • “Systems of Communication”

I’m especially excited about that last one, because you can hear Yours Truly on it, in discussion with Django Wexler, John Appel, Arkady Martine, and Sherwood Smith!

2020 4th Street Programming – Podcast Edition

 

Publication: The Gentry

My short story, The Gentry, is live in the Summer 2020 issue of Kaleidotrope! Alongside 6 other excellent stories and five poems, you’ll find my tale of the diner with the portal between worlds… after the owners have retired, and condos have gone up in its place, and one last fairy chevalier is still stuck on Earth.

This story has gone through a long and twisty history – it once killed the professional magazine PerVisions. But the chevalier has made it back to New York at last.

Some notes and background on the story below the fold. Contains spoilers.

Continue reading Publication: The Gentry